Crisis Act

Synopsis

Set in 2011, Crisis Act follows a YouTube conspiracy theorist named Pete whose mounting internet fueled paranoia hits a dangerous breaking point for his mental health and physical safety when he discovers a lost phone with surveillance photos of him on it. Desperate as to who may be watching him and what they want, he arranges a meeting with one of his only remaining friends Zach at a local restaurant to seek help.
Crisis Act

Review

3/5
A thrilling short film packaged in paranoia and conspiracy.
Alex Gheorghe brings a thrilling short film that is packaged in paranoia and conspiracy. It tells the story of a Pete (Antonino Pruiti), an anxious man who discovers photos of himself on a by-passers dropped cell-phone. In desperation and agitation, he consoles in a trusted work-colleague, Zach (Trevor Ketcheson), unfortunately his colleague is more concerned about his surreal state-of-mind.

The style of cinematography, which is primarily handheld, aids the viewer into a world of paranoia. The heavy use of multiple angles, colour switching and distorted focus, gives the impression the character is being closely watched – by some or by many. Not only does this help to intensify the scene, but allows the viewer to feel the severe anxiety and agitation of the protagonist.

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As Zach leaves, without no known reason, Pete is quickly joined by an arrogant grey-haired man, who appears to hypnotise him in doing exactly what he says; to “start a revolution”. The film concludes with psychological mayhem, showcased by the sound of screams and gunshots.

Crisis Act is unable to reward a narrative resolution, as more questions are left by the abrupt and chaotic ending. However, taking stock of the theme of paranoia – the writing, cinematography and acting delivers finely exactly what is set out to do – confuse.

Cast/Crew

Director(s):
Director of Photography:
Animation:
Sound:
Music:
Miscellaneous:

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Published in August 2021

Recommended

Cast/Crew

Director(s):
Director of Photography:
Animation:
Sound:
Music:
Miscellaneous:

Recommended

Crisis Act

Synopsis

Set in 2011, Crisis Act follows a YouTube conspiracy theorist named Pete whose mounting internet fueled paranoia hits a dangerous breaking point for his mental health and physical safety when he discovers a lost phone with surveillance photos of him on it. Desperate as to who may be watching him and what they want, he arranges a meeting with one of his only remaining friends Zach at a local restaurant to seek help.

Review

A thrilling short film packaged in paranoia and conspiracy.

3/5
Alex Gheorghe brings a thrilling short film that is packaged in paranoia and conspiracy. It tells the story of a Pete (Antonino Pruiti), an anxious man who discovers photos of himself on a by-passers dropped cell-phone. In desperation and agitation, he consoles in a trusted work-colleague, Zach (Trevor Ketcheson), unfortunately his colleague is more concerned about his surreal state-of-mind.

The style of cinematography, which is primarily handheld, aids the viewer into a world of paranoia. The heavy use of multiple angles, colour switching and distorted focus, gives the impression the character is being closely watched – by some or by many. Not only does this help to intensify the scene, but allows the viewer to feel the severe anxiety and agitation of the protagonist.

Crisis Act
As Zach leaves, without no known reason, Pete is quickly joined by an arrogant grey-haired man, who appears to hypnotise him in doing exactly what he says; to “start a revolution”. The film concludes with psychological mayhem, showcased by the sound of screams and gunshots.

Crisis Act is unable to reward a narrative resolution, as more questions are left by the abrupt and chaotic ending. However, taking stock of the theme of paranoia – the writing, cinematography and acting delivers finely exactly what is set out to do – confuse.

Recommended

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