Dear Son

Synopsis

After the death of his mother a young man withdraws from society and turns to alcohol. On his birthday, a letter arrives that may change his life forever.

Review

4/5
A poignant drama that explores the destructive consequences of grief.
Written and directed by Yuncheng Chen, ‘Dear Son’ is a drama film that explores grief, mental health and alcohol dependency. Ian Kim stars as Jiahe, a young man who has retreated to an unhealthy lifestyle after the death of his mother. The Canadian short is partially in the Chinese language with English subtitles. A moving narrative that will resonate with many.

The 7-minute drama opens with Jiahe waking-up to a phone call from his girlfriend – voiced by Ruijie Liu. After wishing him a happy birthday, his girlfriend calls for his return home to visit his ailing father. Jiahe shows unconcern as he stubbles around his apartment – littered with alcohol bottles. Suddenly, a chap at the door results in the arrival of a gift. The narrative takes a poignant turn as he reads the attached letter – a message from his late mother. The letter acts as the catalyst for our protagonist to change his ways. Sherry Huang delivers a heartfelt performance as the mother.

Dear Son Short Film
Yuncheng Chen and his cast/crew have created a spectacular short that explores the destructive consequences of bereavement. Visually, the film is beautifully shot with outstanding cinematography by Chen. Editing, sound, music and lighting are of equal merit. Highly recommended.

Cast/Crew

Director(s): Yuncheng Chen
Writer(s): Dan Peng, Ruijie Liu, Yuncheng Chen
Cast: Ian Kim, Ruijie Liu, Sherry Huang
Producer(s): Mangwai Jacky Lam, Ruijie Liu, Yuncheng Chen
Director of Photography: Yuncheng Chen
Editor(s): Yuncheng Chen
Animation:
Sound: Ruijie Liu
Music: Chiris Coleman,Fry Cold
Miscellaneous: Dan Peng,Mangwai Jacky Lam,Ruijie Liu,Yuncheng Chen

Specifications

Genre: Drama
Subjects: Addiction, Death, Depression, Grief, Heartbreak, Hope, Illness, Love, Mental Health, Mother and Son, Motherhood, Relationships
Country: Canada
Language: Chinese, English
Year: 2022
Publication Date:

Recommended

Cast/Crew

Director(s): Yuncheng Chen
Writer(s): Dan Peng, Ruijie Liu, Yuncheng Chen
Cast: Ian Kim, Ruijie Liu, Sherry Huang
Producer(s): Mangwai Jacky Lam, Ruijie Liu, Yuncheng Chen
Director of Photography: Yuncheng Chen
Editor(s): Yuncheng Chen
Animation:
Sound: Ruijie Liu
Music: Chiris Coleman,Fry Cold
Miscellaneous: Dan Peng,Mangwai Jacky Lam,Ruijie Liu,Yuncheng Chen

Specifcations

Genre: Drama
Subjects: Addiction, Death, Depression, Grief, Heartbreak, Hope, Illness, Love, Mental Health, Mother and Son, Motherhood, Relationships
Country: Canada
Language: Chinese, English
Year: 2022

Recommended

Dear Son

Synopsis

After the death of his mother a young man withdraws from society and turns to alcohol. On his birthday, a letter arrives that may change his life forever.

Review

A poignant drama that explores the destructive consequences of grief.

4/5
Written and directed by Yuncheng Chen, ‘Dear Son’ is a drama film that explores grief, mental health and alcohol dependency. Ian Kim stars as Jiahe, a young man who has retreated to an unhealthy lifestyle after the death of his mother. The Canadian short is partially in the Chinese language with English subtitles. A moving narrative that will resonate with many.

The 7-minute drama opens with Jiahe waking-up to a phone call from his girlfriend – voiced by Ruijie Liu. After wishing him a happy birthday, his girlfriend calls for his return home to visit his ailing father. Jiahe shows unconcern as he stubbles around his apartment – littered with alcohol bottles. Suddenly, a chap at the door results in the arrival of a gift. The narrative takes a poignant turn as he reads the attached letter – a message from his late mother. The letter acts as the catalyst for our protagonist to change his ways. Sherry Huang delivers a heartfelt performance as the mother.

Dear Son Short Film
Yuncheng Chen and his cast/crew have created a spectacular short that explores the destructive consequences of bereavement. Visually, the film is beautifully shot with outstanding cinematography by Chen. Editing, sound, music and lighting are of equal merit. Highly recommended.

Recommended