The Heart Asunder

Synopsis

A young mother talks to her daughter as she walks through a country park, before a meeting with her concerned partner.

Review

4/5
A poignant drama about motherhood, grief and mental health.
Written and directed by Jay Mansell, ‘The Heart Asunder’ is a poignant drama that explores grief, motherhood and mental health. Beatrice Allen stars as Alicia – a young melancholic woman who walks with a baby stroller in her local park. Thomas Loone co-stars as Alicia’s distressed partner, Nathan. The entire short film is set in real time and partially in one continuous shot.

The 3-minute film opens with Alicia talking to her baby about motherhood and the unconditional love it presents. Alicia speaks about the inspiration behind her child’s name and of her late mother. The film takes a somber turn when speaks about her baby in a past-tense, with diminished hopes and desire to see her child become a mother herself. Nathan (Thomas Loone) arrives in trepidation – concerned about his partners emotional and mental well-being. The film concludes revealing an empty stroller and the grief-stricken parents in embrace.

The Heart Asunder Short Film
High praise to Jay Mansell (Writer/Director) for delivering a profoundly moving piece of film, tastefully showcasing a mother’s struggle after the loss of her baby. The narrative, albeit simple, is carefully constructed to not give too much away – allowing the audience to feel the presence of a child (as the mother does). Beatrice Allen’s performance as Alicia is outstanding with captivating emotional depth. Thomas Loone (Nathan) portrays the concerned partner with sincerity – the performance will resonate with many grief-stricken fathers. Visually, cinematography is of an acceptable standard with good quality sound and editing. Image stabilization may be distracting to some, but the touching narrative outshines any technical abnormalities. Highly recommended.

Cast/Crew

Director(s): Jay Mansell
Writer(s): Jay Mansell
Cast: Beatrice Allen, Thomas Loone
Producer(s): Jay Mansell
Director of Photography:
Editor(s):
Animation:
Sound:
Music:
Miscellaneous:

Specifications

Genre: Drama
Subjects: Death, Depression, Family, Grief, Hope, Loss, Mental Health, Mother and Daughter, Motherhood
Country: United Kingdom
Language: English
Year: 2021
Publication Date:

Recommended

Cast/Crew

Director(s): Jay Mansell
Writer(s): Jay Mansell
Cast: Beatrice Allen, Thomas Loone
Producer(s): Jay Mansell
Director of Photography:
Editor(s):
Animation:
Sound:
Music:
Miscellaneous:

Specifcations

Genre: Drama
Subjects: Death, Depression, Family, Grief, Hope, Loss, Mental Health, Mother and Daughter, Motherhood
Country: United Kingdom
Language: English
Year: 2021

Recommended

The Heart Asunder

Synopsis

A young mother talks to her daughter as she walks through a country park, before a meeting with her concerned partner.

Review

A poignant drama about motherhood, grief and mental health.

4/5
Written and directed by Jay Mansell, ‘The Heart Asunder’ is a poignant drama that explores grief, motherhood and mental health. Beatrice Allen stars as Alicia – a young melancholic woman who walks with a baby stroller in her local park. Thomas Loone co-stars as Alicia’s distressed partner, Nathan. The entire short film is set in real time and partially in one continuous shot.

The 3-minute film opens with Alicia talking to her baby about motherhood and the unconditional love it presents. Alicia speaks about the inspiration behind her child’s name and of her late mother. The film takes a somber turn when speaks about her baby in a past-tense, with diminished hopes and desire to see her child become a mother herself. Nathan (Thomas Loone) arrives in trepidation – concerned about his partners emotional and mental well-being. The film concludes revealing an empty stroller and the grief-stricken parents in embrace.

The Heart Asunder Short Film
High praise to Jay Mansell (Writer/Director) for delivering a profoundly moving piece of film, tastefully showcasing a mother’s struggle after the loss of her baby. The narrative, albeit simple, is carefully constructed to not give too much away – allowing the audience to feel the presence of a child (as the mother does). Beatrice Allen’s performance as Alicia is outstanding with captivating emotional depth. Thomas Loone (Nathan) portrays the concerned partner with sincerity – the performance will resonate with many grief-stricken fathers. Visually, cinematography is of an acceptable standard with good quality sound and editing. Image stabilization may be distracting to some, but the touching narrative outshines any technical abnormalities. Highly recommended.

Recommended