Interview with

Anthony Vander

Director of

Anthony Vander

What was the inspiration behind making this short film?

I would say there were several things that influenced us to take this direction with the film. East London, where our writers (Tofi & Olu Sobodu) were living at the time had experienced a surge in acid attacks and we thought it would be a very current topic to delve into. We also wanted the story to be centred around young people closer to Tofi’s and Olu’s age; (15-18) and felt their writers voice and vision could really speak to a younger audience. Furthermore we also wanted the film to raise awareness to an important cause.

Was there any particular challenges you had to go through to make the short film happen?

Though there are some horror stories about night shoots, we were really supported by a great team, so we were able to capture different parts of London and performances at night, which really lifts the film. Unfortunately getting clearance to film an acid attack scene in the Tower Hamlets – due to a surge of attacks in the area – was particularly difficult but with lots of negotiation and a notice to film; we were able to film the acid attack scene in a different area altogether. We are so glad that our film depicts the recovery and victory of the victim.

How has the short film been received?

We have received our first official selection into Lift Off Sessions in June 2020. We were semi finalists for the Africa For Impact Festival awards in 2020 and just recently received a honorary mention for the London Seasonal Short Film Festival. Film reviews have praised the cinematography and homage to industrialism – which is due to our excellent cinematographer Jed Camara. But we are hoping to do more and better in the near future.

Do you have any other projects in the pipeline?

Just finished shooting a short film earlier this year and will be going on the festival trail during the summer. I’m currently developing a feature film which I will shoot in 2022.

What advice would you give to anyone wanting to make their first short film?

I would say the key is in – doing. With ‘Fading’ some of our cast were making a screen debut. Which means they were very new to almost all of it. The fact that they were able to really immerse themselves into their roles for the very first time is a mentality that can be adapted across as fields. We all have smart phones so go out and shoot! Don’t think that you have to have the best camera to create content. Have a strong passion and vision for the story you want to tell. Always! Preparation and teamwork is very key. Again with Fading we prepared for several months and learnt so much along the way. A brilliant team will ensure that your vision is not only fulfilled but also elevated. The final advice for those making their first short film is to enjoy it.

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Interview with

Anthony Vander

Director of

Anthony Vander

What was the inspiration behind making this short film?

I would say there were several things that influenced us to take this direction with the film. East London, where our writers (Tofi & Olu Sobodu) were living at the time had experienced a surge in acid attacks and we thought it would be a very current topic to delve into. We also wanted the story to be centred around young people closer to Tofi’s and Olu’s age; (15-18) and felt their writers voice and vision could really speak to a younger audience. Furthermore we also wanted the film to raise awareness to an important cause.

Was there any particular challenges you had to go through to make the short film happen?

Though there are some horror stories about night shoots, we were really supported by a great team, so we were able to capture different parts of London and performances at night, which really lifts the film. Unfortunately getting clearance to film an acid attack scene in the Tower Hamlets – due to a surge of attacks in the area – was particularly difficult but with lots of negotiation and a notice to film; we were able to film the acid attack scene in a different area altogether. We are so glad that our film depicts the recovery and victory of the victim.

How has the short film been received?

We have received our first official selection into Lift Off Sessions in June 2020. We were semi finalists for the Africa For Impact Festival awards in 2020 and just recently received a honorary mention for the London Seasonal Short Film Festival. Film reviews have praised the cinematography and homage to industrialism – which is due to our excellent cinematographer Jed Camara. But we are hoping to do more and better in the near future.

Do you have any other projects in the pipeline?

Just finished shooting a short film earlier this year and will be going on the festival trail during the summer. I’m currently developing a feature film which I will shoot in 2022.

What advice would you give to anyone wanting to make their first short film?

I would say the key is in – doing. With ‘Fading’ some of our cast were making a screen debut. Which means they were very new to almost all of it. The fact that they were able to really immerse themselves into their roles for the very first time is a mentality that can be adapted across as fields. We all have smart phones so go out and shoot! Don’t think that you have to have the best camera to create content. Have a strong passion and vision for the story you want to tell. Always! Preparation and teamwork is very key. Again with Fading we prepared for several months and learnt so much along the way. A brilliant team will ensure that your vision is not only fulfilled but also elevated. The final advice for those making their first short film is to enjoy it.

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