Interview with

Joan Pauls

Director/Writer of

Joan Pauls

What was the inspiration behind making this short film?

This short film has its origins on the Elizabeth Bowen’s book ‘Mysterious Kor’, which shows Britan at war and the way war inconveniences the lives of three people and how they cope with the situations that war-time puts them in. The book has a very interesting approach and we kept that essence to do the film, although the adaptation is quite different.

Was there any particular challenges you had to go through to make the short film happen?

Yes, it is a period film, where we have to go back to 1940’s and, being an indie short film, that’s always a challenge. Even if we play it all in interiors, as we did, because leaving outside was impossible for budget and the story didn’t need it either. Also, the short has intrigue and dreamlike elements, and to add them keeping it real was a great challenge as a director. We have a big secret to reveal and we had to play our cards so it was only revealed at the end.

How has the short film been received?

At that time, we didn’t do a massive distribution to festivals – sadly – but the film always work for audiences, who are struck at the end and who are kept thinking about the cruelty and injustice of war. It is a little story that gets big in the audiences heads, and they generally like the film. It’s an example of the saying ‘less is more’.

Do you have any other projects in the pipeline?

Yes, I always do. Having the necessity of constantly tell stories is the only way of surviving in the filmmaking field. Now I am on the process of making my first feature film, a project between Los Angeles and Barcelona that talks about the dreams we have and the way we have it. It’s the hardest of the steps, so at the same time and producing a short film about children’s cancer and working on TV.

What advice would you give to anyone wanting to make their first short film?

In your first short film, you have to feel free. To do what you want, what you feel. One of the advantatges of the short format is that you can go on your own, and that’s especially important on the first one. And remember: the first short film doesn’t need to be great, it needs to be done.

Recently Featured

Interview with

Joan Pauls

Director/Writer of

Joan Pauls

What was the inspiration behind making this short film?

This short film has its origins on the Elizabeth Bowen’s book ‘Mysterious Kor’, which shows Britan at war and the way war inconveniences the lives of three people and how they cope with the situations that war-time puts them in. The book has a very interesting approach and we kept that essence to do the film, although the adaptation is quite different.

Was there any particular challenges you had to go through to make the short film happen?

Yes, it is a period film, where we have to go back to 1940’s and, being an indie short film, that’s always a challenge. Even if we play it all in interiors, as we did, because leaving outside was impossible for budget and the story didn’t need it either. Also, the short has intrigue and dreamlike elements, and to add them keeping it real was a great challenge as a director. We have a big secret to reveal and we had to play our cards so it was only revealed at the end.

How has the short film been received?

At that time, we didn’t do a massive distribution to festivals – sadly – but the film always work for audiences, who are struck at the end and who are kept thinking about the cruelty and injustice of war. It is a little story that gets big in the audiences heads, and they generally like the film. It’s an example of the saying ‘less is more’.

Do you have any other projects in the pipeline?

Yes, I always do. Having the necessity of constantly tell stories is the only way of surviving in the filmmaking field. Now I am on the process of making my first feature film, a project between Los Angeles and Barcelona that talks about the dreams we have and the way we have it. It’s the hardest of the steps, so at the same time and producing a short film about children’s cancer and working on TV.

What advice would you give to anyone wanting to make their first short film?

In your first short film, you have to feel free. To do what you want, what you feel. One of the advantatges of the short format is that you can go on your own, and that’s especially important on the first one. And remember: the first short film doesn’t need to be great, it needs to be done.

Latest Releases