Interview with

Lindy S. Hudis

Director/Writer of

Lindy S. Hudis

What was the inspiration behind making this short film?

It’s funny actually. I was living in Hollywood at the time, and was a struggling actress supporting myself with little odd jobs here and there. Most of the time I did temp work, and after one particularly hard job, I just ran a hot bubble bath and sank into the nice, bubbly water. One of the supervisors was very abusive to myself as well as the other girls. It’s always frustrating when somebody in a position of power – it could be a powerful producer bullying actors and crew or a nasty customer at Denny’s being a jerk to the waitress – can be unusually cruel for no other reason than that they simply can. I know if real life they don’t always get their comeuppance, but it’s always nice to fantasize that they do. Life teaches us lessons after all.

Was there any particular challenges you had to go through to make the short film happen?

We needed a house to shoot in, and that was a fiasco in and of itself! So many scammers literally crawled out of the woodwork! Some wanted a five hundred dollar cash deposit, others were simply being problematic. I know people are protective of their homes, as I would be, but come on! One does not need to take advantage of a situation. So, we got lucky and a group of guys I know who were all roommates let us shoot at their house. They even bought sushi for the cast and crew! I got a real education about filmmaking, that’s for sure. We also had to do a bit of “Guerrilla filmmaking” for the shots in Beverly Hills. There was no way I could have afforded a permit, but we were cool about it and didn’t cause a commotion. My husband is a stunt driver and he knew all the tricks about shooting a car sequence.

How has the short film been received?

It was screened at the Seattle Underground Film Festival and Cine Nights LA in 2000. We went up to Seattle for the screening and I was very happy at the audience telling me “good job”. It definitely put a smile on my face. “You’ve never seen a real-life morality tale quite like Lindy Sternberger’s 1 1 -minute The Lesson (let’s just say real life should be just like this).” – SPIN Magazine, July 2000

Do you have any other projects in the pipeline?

Right now I have been submitting my feature screenplays to contests and competitions. I have a horror/thriller, a drama and an action adventure. I also have published several novels that would make great film/television projects. I am also a published author of multi-genre fiction. I would love to break into screenwriting and have my books made into films or television. That is the fantasy of every author I know.

What advice would you give to anyone wanting to make their first short film?

To do it! Don’t procrastinate or think anything negative! Gather your friends, relatives, contacts from film school, neighbors anybody. Ask favors and promise them a credit. The most important thing to do is to get do it! Also, you will know who your real friends are. Real friends will bend over backwards to help you, haters will make themselves known by trying to take advantage. Stay strong and clear with your vision and never give up on your dream!!

Recently Featured

Interview with

Lindy S. Hudis

Director/Writer of

Lindy S. Hudis

What was the inspiration behind making this short film?

It’s funny actually. I was living in Hollywood at the time, and was a struggling actress supporting myself with little odd jobs here and there. Most of the time I did temp work, and after one particularly hard job, I just ran a hot bubble bath and sank into the nice, bubbly water. One of the supervisors was very abusive to myself as well as the other girls. It’s always frustrating when somebody in a position of power – it could be a powerful producer bullying actors and crew or a nasty customer at Denny’s being a jerk to the waitress – can be unusually cruel for no other reason than that they simply can. I know if real life they don’t always get their comeuppance, but it’s always nice to fantasize that they do. Life teaches us lessons after all.

Was there any particular challenges you had to go through to make the short film happen?

We needed a house to shoot in, and that was a fiasco in and of itself! So many scammers literally crawled out of the woodwork! Some wanted a five hundred dollar cash deposit, others were simply being problematic. I know people are protective of their homes, as I would be, but come on! One does not need to take advantage of a situation. So, we got lucky and a group of guys I know who were all roommates let us shoot at their house. They even bought sushi for the cast and crew! I got a real education about filmmaking, that’s for sure. We also had to do a bit of “Guerrilla filmmaking” for the shots in Beverly Hills. There was no way I could have afforded a permit, but we were cool about it and didn’t cause a commotion. My husband is a stunt driver and he knew all the tricks about shooting a car sequence.

How has the short film been received?

It was screened at the Seattle Underground Film Festival and Cine Nights LA in 2000. We went up to Seattle for the screening and I was very happy at the audience telling me “good job”. It definitely put a smile on my face. “You’ve never seen a real-life morality tale quite like Lindy Sternberger’s 1 1 -minute The Lesson (let’s just say real life should be just like this).” – SPIN Magazine, July 2000

Do you have any other projects in the pipeline?

Right now I have been submitting my feature screenplays to contests and competitions. I have a horror/thriller, a drama and an action adventure. I also have published several novels that would make great film/television projects. I am also a published author of multi-genre fiction. I would love to break into screenwriting and have my books made into films or television. That is the fantasy of every author I know.

What advice would you give to anyone wanting to make their first short film?

To do it! Don’t procrastinate or think anything negative! Gather your friends, relatives, contacts from film school, neighbors anybody. Ask favors and promise them a credit. The most important thing to do is to get do it! Also, you will know who your real friends are. Real friends will bend over backwards to help you, haters will make themselves known by trying to take advantage. Stay strong and clear with your vision and never give up on your dream!!

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